Vitamin D3 Will Change the World

by,

Suzanne Coleman, MD

Two new studies published recently continue to show the major importance of vitamin D to human health, both physical and mental.

Medscape.com reported on both studies.  One study showed that vitamin D supplementation improves depression (which we already knew, didn’t we?).  The other study showed that treating vitamin D deficiency in malnourished children led to not only an increase in weight (vs. kids not given extra vitamin D) but also increased their intelligence.

How will this change the world?  If areas which have malnourished infants and children begin to supplement vitamin D in order to end vitamin D deficiency, this will improve the population’s health and intelligence, making the areas more resilient and successful and better able to address the challenges that they face. It will also decrease the presence and negative impacts of depression and other health problems.  Since programs already exist to address malnourishment through the use of high calorie food supplements, the study’s results suggest that providing higher doses of vitamin D in the food supplements is an option for those with vitamin D deficiency which will lead to better outcomes for these children.

Malnourishment in developed countries like the United States may underlie many individual health and social issues as well, but may not be as recognized as it does not exist to the extremes that it does in some other areas of the world.  In these areas of the USA, several factors may contribute to low vitamin D levels, including lack of access to vitamin D in foods or supplements and a lack of sufficient sunlight exposure due to geographic location.

But vitamin D deficiency is not only seen in malnourished people, it is a wide-spread problem.  Low vitamin D is bad because it is linked to depression among many other physical and mental health issues.  Appropriate treatment with adequate amounts of vitamin D3 should reduce many problems, including depression which can have a number of negative effects on a person and society including self-neglect and self-harm, unintended child neglect and abuse, unemployment, lost time at work, low self-esteem, and drug abuse and dependence among others.  Depression and low vitamin D can occur in anyone regardless of gender, race, age, or financial position.

The scope of depression is immense.  Study two notes that “Globally, more than 300 million people suffer from depression. It’s the number one cause of years lost to disability worldwide. In the United States, the overall prevalence of vitamin D deficiency hovers around 42%, with the highest rate seen in blacks.” [2]  This is important to note as many medical professionals continue to hold the false belief that those with darker skin do not have the risk of vitamin D deficiency.

Providing vitamin D testing to all patients worldwide will give the patient and their medical provider a baseline understanding of their overall health needs in regards to vitamin D3 supplementation and this testing is highly recommended by myself and other medical professionals.  A simple test can change a person’s life for the better.  Educate yourselves and others on this opportunity.  Vitamin D3 is an easy oral vitamin to take if your levels are low, see my more in-depth article here on the details about vitamin D3 supplementation.

Take care of yourself!

_____________________________________

References:

  1. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/896391?nlid=122275_4502&src=wnl_dne_180510_mscpedit&uac=113256SN&impID=1628885&faf=1
  2. https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/896449?nlid=122367_4502&src=wnl_dne_180511_mscpedit&uac=113256SN&impID=1629894&faf=1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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